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should take a forward thinking approach and a look at more technologically neutral, but regulatory way of thinking about some of the services. when it comes to fiber to plummet, we should not think of it in the same way as we thought of copper wire monopolies back in the 1970's. we should think about fiber providers. >> do you think your fellow commissioners would think the same way? >> it depends on the issue. some issues we agree and some we did not. it does not have to deal with the fcc directly. governor brown in california assigned -- making sure that internet protocols would remain free from regulation. that was a bipartisan group coming together saying we want to have an ovation and we want to incentivize investment in that next -- an ovation and we want to incentivize assessment and the next generation. >> joining our conversation is one of our guest reporters. >> let us talk a bit more about communication. you were just mentioning -- do you think in a few years tech companies will be competitive with cable companies in wire line access? >> i think so. there has been an increas
modern technology, for us to respond to that hateful speech and powers and the individual who engages in such a speech to create chaos around the world. we empower the worst of us if that is how we respond. more broadly, the advance of the last two weeks also speak to the need for all of us to honestly and then -- to address the tensions between the west and the arab world which is moving toward democracy. let me be clear. just as we cannot solve every problem in the world, the united states has not and will not seek to dictate the outcome of democratic transitions abroad. we do not expect other nations to agree with us on every issue. nor do we assume that the violence of the past weeks or the hateful speech by some individuals represent the views of the overwhelming majority of muslims. any more than the views of the people who produced these -- who produced this video represent the views of america. however, i do believe that it is the obligation of all leaders in all countries to speak out forcefully against violence and extremism. [applause] it is time to marginalize those who, e
. and a clean, green economy, with the low carbon technologies, leading the world. [applause] i have to tell you, in the last half, the most short-sighted of arguments, that we have to choose between going green. this is not just the right thing to do, this is a fantastic opportunity. the economy in britain is going strong we're right now. to create thousands of jobs, and the technology that will power a economies in the decades to come. going green, means going for growth. more energy that we produce ourselves, as a planet that we can proudly and over to our children. and going green means -- but the conservatives know there is no doubt that we will hold on to their promises on the environment. [applause] of course, there was a time when it looked like they got it. it seems like a long time ago, and there is the naturalist face. the windmills are gently turning, the sun is shining, and the exercise is quite brilliant. partyen at last year's conference they ruined it all, that you can vote blue and go green, but of course you can't. in order to at -- in order to make blue turned to green, you ha
, and that help us get out on the cutting edge of the new technologies that will create millions of new jobs. because, when we sell these new products here, we'll then be able to sell them overseas. there is a ravenous demand for them overseas. now, another big difference is governor bush is proposing to open up some of our most precious environmental treasures, like the arctic national wildlife refuge for the big oil companies to go in and start producing oil there. i think that is the wrong choice. it would only give us a few months' worth of oil and the oil wouldn't start flowing for many years into the future. i don't think it's a fair price to pay to destroy precious parts of america's environment. we have to bet on the future and move beyond the current technologies to have a whole new generation of more efficient, cleaner, energy technology. >> it's an issue i know a lot about. i was a small oil person for a while in west texas. this is an administration that's had no plan. and all of a sudden the results of having no plan have caught up with america. first and foremost we have to ful
, powered by the new low- carbon technologies. britain leading the world. [applause] but i have to tell you, we will not succeed in this last task unless we can see off that most short-sighted of arguments, that we have to choose between going green and going for growth. decarbonising our economy isn't just the right thing to do, it's a fantastic economic opportunity. the green economy in britain is growing strongly right now, bringing in billions of pounds and creating thousands of jobs -- in wind, solar and tidal energy, the technologies that will power our economy in the decades to come. going green means going for growth. but more than that, it means going for more energy that we produce ourselves and which never runs out, it means going for clear air and clean water and a planet we can proudly hand over to our children. going green means going forward. so let the conservatives be in no doubt. we will hold them to their promises on the environment. [applause] of course, there was a time when it looked like they got it. it seems a long time ago now. when the tories were going through the
. obviously, it will take time to change when things are so polarized. but with the new technology of the nets, where everybody has access, they can generally addressed this as an offsetting factor. is certainly does not need more money. we know that. but if i can do whatever i want with as many people as i can reach -- that is different again, and i like to quote from jefferson. it does make it different. ben franklin or somebody had to set that into print. now you really have an on limited ability to reach as many people who will read it. -- it really does have an unlimited ability to reach as many people who will read. >> the net is different from the newspaper. on the net, in infinite number of people could read your blog post. the difference is no one will come to your blog post unless you put money behind it. there are similar barriers. you could do of viral thing and it could take off. but the candidate, you're printing press is now has valuable as the future printing press because you have access. is a little more difficult. >> i thought you were going to say we took a murky topic and
of state of the art technology and research while maintaining a moratorium on nuclear testing. thomas commented on the anniversary this past weekend. he said in april 2009 president obama shared his vision of a world without nuclear weapons. as we work toward that goal, we have the world's leading scientific facilities, the world's fastest computers, and the world's brightest minds working to insure we never again have to perform nuclear explosive testing in the united states. the effort that he describes helps maintain an effective nuclear stockpile in the absence of underground nuclear testing. they include the stockpile stewardship program run by the national nuclear security administration which maintains the continued safety and reliability of the nation's nuclear-weapons in the absence of nuclear explosive testing. a key goal is to increase scientific understanding of how nuclear devices perform as well as the behavior of the weapons materials to ensure a safe and effective nuclear deterrent. second is the life extension program. the extent the service life of the current weapon
these existing technologies? or would be better served by pursuing newer technologies until we have more options. could be more specific on the types to you support? >> play the last part. >> are we moving in the right direction? or would we be better served by newer technologies, withholding major capital investment until the are more options? >> we already have proven technologies. wind is already supplying 4%. that is with massive subsidies. we need to split that around. fossil fuel companies, right where they need that tax money, take it and use it to pay for wind and solar projects. use the power of the federal government. every federal building should have some sort of renewable energy behind it. the federal government is a big money spender and should spend the money on the right things, which would help the businesses with these products, which would just bring more and more jobs in wind and solar, for instance. as far as green technologies, i am all for that. not call sequestering or whenever the boondoggle of the day as. we should definitely invest in new technology research to see how
words, it will effect the economy. i think that whoever figures out social media and technology, new ways of communicating with voters, linking policy -- because the way we have all communicated with each other and election-yearer, tv ads, cable, with all due respect, i wish you a comeback. i think that is a thing of the past. i think it will be a thing of the past. whoever is able in these three voting blocs, whoever is able to figure out a party, democrats, republicans, a third party, how to lincoln permission flow, education, expanding voter turnout. that is still a problem. we will only have 57% of eligible voters voting. they will control the american body politic. i see that as a healthy thing. so i posed a problem without an answer. at least i will say i think i am optimistic that this new technology is going to bring more education -- information to people in those three groups that i think are the ones that will determine where this country goes. >> governor schwarzenegger -- this is your institute, so you have the last word. >> i think one of the things we should also talk
there in the future. science, technology, and space offering technology to everybody, all the you -- all of the young ones coming up. ronald reagan is clearly the strongest leader of the free world. i will be honest with you. it is a joy to serve with a president who does not apologize for the united states of america. mr. mondale on the other hand has one idea. go out and tax the american people. he wants to wipe out the one protection that those of the lowest end of the economic scale have protecting them against being rammed into higher and higher tax brackets. we owe our country too much to go back to that kind of an approach. i would like to say something to the young people. i know what it is to have a dream and to have a job and to work hard to really participate and to the american dream. some of your finishing high school and college, some of your starting off in the workplace. we want america oppose the greatest grift -- america's greatest griffeift. it is absolutely essential that we guarantee the young people that the they will not know the agony of war. gift, opportunity and peace. we mu
in the future on military technology and on greater mobility, greater airlift, greater sealift, the b-22 airplane. we're going to have to do some things that are quite costly. and i simply don't believe we can afford nor do we need to keep 150,000 troops in europe given how much the red army, now under the control of russia, has been cut, the arms control agreement concluded between mr. bush and mr. yeltsin, something i have applauded. i don't think we need 150,000 troops. let me make one other point. mr. bush talked about taxes. he didn't tell you that he vetoed a middle class tax cut because it would be paid for by raising taxes on the wealthy and vetoed an investment tax credit paid for by raising taxes on the wealthy. >> all right. we go now to mr. perot for a two-minute question, and it will be asked by john mashek. >> mr perot, you talked about fairness just a minute ago and sharing the pain. as part of your plan to reduce the ballooning federal deficit, you've suggested that we raise gasoline taxes 50 cents a gallon over five years. why punish the middle class consumer to such a d
the technology by investing in clean coal technology. we should be creating jobs. john mccain has voted 20 times against funding alternative energy sources and thinks, i guess, the only answer is drill, drill, drill. drill we must, but it will take 10 years for one drop of oil to come out of any of the wells that are going to begun to be drilled. in the meantime, we're all going to be in real trouble. >> let me clear something up, senator mccain has said he supports caps on carbon emissions. senator obama has said he supports clean coal technology, which i don't believe you've always supported. >> i have always supported it. that's a fact. >> well, clear it up for us, both of you, and start with governor palin. >> yes, senator mccain does support this. the chant is "drill, baby, drill." and that's what we hear all across this country in our rallies because people are so hungry for those domestic sources of energy to be tapped into. they know that even in my own energy-producing state we have billions of barrels of oil and hundreds of trillions of cubic feet of clean, green natural gas. and we're
. >> thank you for mentioning washingtonwatch.com. i see some of the biggest technology blockers are constantly scraping and striving for mention of their sites. that would not seem to hurt very much. i appreciate daniel's work in the work of the sunlight foundation and his perspective on things. it is important to give thing some perspective. i was interested of the mention of the "read the bill" push. that phrase is not really mean that people literally wants, though they may think they want congress to sit down and and read the bill, is about a broader thing across the country. it is part of a broader push that these are a part appeared when i look at the history of this issue it goes back to the election of president obama and the real energy he brought on the campaign trail in 2008 to the question of transparency and the good government we all in addition. from my perspective by about 2010 that energy had dissipated. a lot of efforts have gone toward a lot of things. we were not seeing that dramatic transformation that a lot of us can visualize. it was a lot happening very m
technologies. it is a diversified company comprised of several well-known brands known to many of you. utc has been a wonderful partner with national journal. they also a partner with us on congressional connection poll, which we conduct while congress is in session to get a sense of what is going on outside of washington and bring that news here. you can be informed via utc and the congressional connection:there. -- congressional connection poll. he leaves all of the federal and state governor affairs as well as all of the activities in that area, china, russia, and the e u. he is well respected and very well liked. please welcome greg warden. >> thank you for the introduction. welcome. it is nice to have an overflow crowd here. something must have happened last night. i think it was probably the nats coming in first place. [applause] this will be a great session. we have had a long affiliation with the national journal as well as personally with charlie. it is always a great event to participate in. this is an exciting morning after the debate. it looks like we might have a presidential race
on military technology and greater mobil tir, greater airlift, greater sea lift, the b-22 airplane. we wilhave to do things that are quite costly. i think we don't need to keep 150,000 troops in europe, gin how red army, now under the control of russia has been cut. the arms agreement concluded between mr. bush don't think we 0,000 i troops. let me make another point. mr. bush talked about taxes. he didn't tell you he vetoed a middle class tax cut and vetoed an investment tafmg credit paid for by raising taxes on the wealthy. >> all right. we go to mr. perot for a two-minute question, and asked by john may can sheck. >> mr. perot, you asked about sharing the pain. as part of plan to reduce the federal deficit, you suggested we raise gasoline taxes 50 cents a gallon over the next five years. why punish the middle class to such a degree? >> it gets to 50 cents at the end of the fifth year. i think "punish" is the wrong word. again, i didn't create this problem. we a trying to solve it. if you study our international competitors, clengts up to $3.50 in taxes and use that mon to create jobs and bu
required court approval. the statute referred to the technology at the time, those communications that were wired, radioed, or satellite technology. since 1978 we have seen a dramatic change of the technology of communications, particularly fiber optic cable, which has changed the court they try to get this case in electronic surveillance. the result is that leading up to 9/11 there are many instances where the government would have to go to get an order from the fisa court before they could wiretap communications overseas. that was not the intent of fisa originally. the amendment of 2008 was meant to address that problem. what it did was say that if the government is trying to surveil somebody overseas and they have a reasonable basis to believe that person is overseas and not in the united states, they do not have to go to the court for a particular provision. that was what was different about the 2008 statute, because it allowed the government to go forward with communications surveillance for a number of people without having to get special permission for each and every communication. t
-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. he is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of the new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard" which he founded in 1995. prior to that, he led the publican -- republican feature. he also has served as foreign policy adviser to senator john mccain. all of you see him regularly on fox news sunday and the fox news channel. i met him in 1981 when he was a very young assistant professor at the university of pennsylvania. the question that i would like to pose for each of you, and i will start with governor what does this through feel about the leadership styles of mitt romney and president obama? >> probably not much. >> ok, will this panel is over. [laughter] >> you could extrapolate a few things from president obama's first term that may be instructive. he is not the manager. he does out of a history of managing things. you bring in a lot of good, well trained people and give them tasks and try
to change. this is a time when things are so polarized. with new technology where everybody has their own axe to grind, address that as a dissuading factor. if i go home tonight, i can do whatever i want to as many people as i can reach. that is different from the time of jefferson. ben franklin are someone only needed to set that in print and now all you need to is to press a button. how does that fit into a campaign? >> obama cannot raise the money without technology. the net is different from a newspaper. you can say whatever you want an infinite number of people can read that. no one will know you wrote that unless you put money behind it or have a way of promoting it. there are similar barriers. you cannot say you're printing press is as important as someone else's printing press. it is more complicated. >> question surprised me. going to say we took a simple subject and made it murky. >> the person who will not read that article is the swing voter. the small donor psychology makes it possible -- we have gotten so many e-mails asking for $3. in 1994, no one asked for $3. it cost jus
what the technology was, so they can get the most out of it. whether it was universal secondary education, and then it was universal post secondary education. second, we have the world's best infrastructure. roads, railroads, third, we have the world's most immigration policy. so we get the most energy etic and talented im-- energetic and talented immigration. fourth, we have the best rules. lastly, we have the most government-funded research. we push the balance on science and technology, so our best innovators are here. in education, we now, well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to ld the world in college graduates. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of civil engineers, we are now $2 trillion in deficits in terms of infrastructure. a great education, and get the hell out of our country. we are fighting on each one of these issues that are so vital to our greatest strength. i don't think we can remedy this . and on budget-funded research, it looks wike an e.k.g. heading for a heart attack. in terms of
. we have so much oil and gas because of new technology that we know how to get without harming the environment. this puts people to work and creates manufacturing jobs. it lowers gas prices. it helps everybody becauseit lowers the cost to heat your home in the winter, to cool it in the summer, the electricity we pay. that means your paycheck goes farther. that means people living on fixed income have more income to live on. this is important. with an energy policy like the keystone pipeline, opening our land for development, we can stop sending our money to the middle east. it helps our economy and paychecks. [applause] another area -- we have all these people in between jobs. for every person who got a job last month, nearly four people stopped looking for a job. we are slipping behind. what we see when we look at the faces, talk to the people, see the names, it is a person in their 30's, 40's, 50's, early 60's. i will get to the person in their 20's in a minute. [laughter] it is a person who came out of school, got a career, got a good job and then their job went away. when t
of technology. and access to finances and development. and access to -- [inaudible] there is a need for a new, global, economic governance. i say there is an urgent need for a new economic global governance is centered on people and aiming at consolidating cooperation between partners in development on the basis of mutual benefits and interests. mr. president, i have laid before you are vision. a vision shared by the egyptian people. i have also attempted to briefly outline egypt's views on the main issues, the vision of the young and the children, the women and the men in egypt on all important questions in the middle east and the rest of the world. in the middle east, africa, and the world, i am sure the united nations is capable of addressing all global and regional challenges through dialogue, understanding, and joint cooperation in accordance of the principles of international law. egypt post-revolution will spare no effort in dealing sincerely with all the members of this organization. we will always remain at the forefront of international endeavor and achieving the freedoms and dignit
the new technology that exists today replacing uranium with thorium. it's ready to use now and has been tested by the world nuclear association. it has been approved everywhere in the world to be used. it is so much safer than uranium. the united states has the third largest supply of it in the world. i honestly believe that if the american people are told about this -- granted, it is new technology, so it has not been out there long time for people to know about it, but somebody has to bring it to the forefront. are you still with me? host: we are listening. caller: for 30 years, this company developed and protected this technology. it is 400% safer to operate. it operates at 375 degrees, not 1500. you cannot make a bomb out of it. it is such a core element that you cannot make a nuclear bomb out of it. even if someone were to bomb the plant, in order for the element must be --, so it would not operate. host: here's a story in the wall street journal -- another story about the debates season -- that the report from the wall street journal. we have asked you whether you would. want the
investments in education. or clean energy. or research. and technology. we can't afford to roll back regulations on wall street banks or oil companies or insurance companies. that is not a jobs plan. it's not a plan to grow our economy. it's sure not a plan to strengthen our middle class. we have been there. we have tried that. we're not going back. we are moving forward. we've got a different view about how we create jobs and prosperity in this country. [applause] this country doesn't just succeed when just a few are doing well at the top. succeed is when the middle lass gets bigger. our economy doesn't grow from the top down. it grows from the middle out. we don't -- we don't believe that anybody's entitled to success in this country. but we do believe in opportunity. we believe in a country where hard work pays off. and responsibility is rewarded. and everybody's getting a fair shot. and everybody's doing their fair share. and everybody's playing by the same rules. believehe country we in. that's what we've been fighting for for the last four years. that's what we are going to put
you talk about new developing technologies. it is a challenge for solar, particularly because i.t. is very expensive, if you don't have the government grants and support like they have in europe to encourage people to put those on their homes, you will not get the volume necessary to bring down the costs and make the tens of thousands of dollars of investment -- takes a long time to pay that off and will be hard for our consumer business to do that. host: these are the some sectors of manufacturing. first is new orders of machinery. what kinds of machinery are talking about? -- are we talking about? guest: anything from bulldozers to machines that make the semiconductors. it is a wide range of machinery. it is a big part of the classification manual for products. things like materials handling equipment, conveyors, stacking machinery, those types of things. host: when we look at this, it is getting to recession levels? guest: it has exceeded pre recessionary levels. back in june, aided $33.3 billion. as we discussed earlier, things are dipping a little bit in the last couple of
we can afford a piece of technological elegance like that. i'd strike that sort of thing from the ticket. i don't know how many people have ridden the concorde, not many, but i voted against it, said it would be a financial disaster and it's been just that. >> senator. >> so, those are the types of things that i would work on. >> senator quayle? >> the way we're going to reduce this budget deficit, and it is a challenge to make sure that it is reduce, is first to stick to the gramm-rudman targets. the gramm-rudman targets have worked. we've reduced the federal budget deficit $70 billion. senator bentsen voted against gramm-rudman, the very tool that has been used to bring the federal budget deficit down. we're going to need all the tools possible to bring this federal budget deficit down. we need the tools of a line item veto. a line item veto that 43 governors in this country have, but not the president of the united states. the president of the united states needs to have a line item veto. when congress goes ahead and puts into appropriations bills unrequested and unnecessar
to the generosity and underwriting support of united technologies. it is a very diversified country comprised of several well-known brands and to many of you. utc has been a wonderful partner with national journal. this is a charlie cook again this year. we conducted a poll while congress was in session and the information here. as readers, you can be informed via utc. i want to say thank you to the entire team at utc for partnering with us on this event and the congressional connection poll. greg ward needs all the government and state affairs for utc. he is well known in washington and will respected and very well liked. please welcome mr. ward. [applause] >> thank you for the introduction. but a wonderful introduction. something must have happened last night. i think it is probably the nats coming in for a place. anyway, this will be a great session this morning. we have had a long affiliation with thcharlie. it is always a great event to participate in. a looks like we might have a presidential race here. i know everyone is looking forward to hearing from charlie. with that, i will handed
, which is a simple "who won?" let's take a look at how things stand right now. my technology is not working. we will come back after this call. it is from abilene in illinois. >> i thought both candidates did a good job. i was a little more impressed with the president. because of that, i am getting off the fence and going with the president. i think the moderator could have exercised more control. he let romney cut in and takeover more than he should have. i found obama to be more believable and i feel that he has prevailed in spite of the legislature. the objective of the legislature to make him a one-term president. and if he wins this next term, that obstruction and the reason for that obstruction will be removed. i think he will be able to get a lot more done because there is no reason for the legislature to keep trying to fight him to make him a one-term president. >> thank you. back to the facebook poll, it is an informal one. it is people who are on the page right now. it stands at 109 for mitt romney and 3864 barack obama. you can -- 368 for barack obama. next is deb
technologies. it is a very diversified company comprised of several well-known brands known to many of you, and they also have utc climate controls and security and utc aerospace, which includes a good rich. utc has been a wonderful partner with "national journal." they also partnered with us on the congressional connection poll to get a sense of what is going on outside of washington and bring that news and information here. and as "national journal" daily readers, it can be informed via utc and the congressional connection poll as well. i want to thank the entire team for partnering with us not only on the charlie cook events, but on the congressional connection told. greg is the senior vice president of global government relations, and he feeds the government affairs activities for utc as well as their activities in china, russia, and the eu. he is well known in washington and well respected and very well liked. please welcome greg. [applause] >> thank you, victoria. >> you're welcome. >> charlie wanted to know when victoria was doing with such a nice introduction for me, for god's sake
nasa kick back and giving us wonderful technologies that propelled us and made most people's lives much more comfortable than they would have been had this technology not entered their lives. host: right now, is government about the right size do you think? or where were the but the scale on its role and its influence on your life? caller: i think that we have to be careful when we talk about the size of government. there seems to be a misunderstanding about what the size of government is. people seem to think the number of federal employees is the size of the government. but the reality is, the problems dictate the size of the government. and if we say, we will shrink the government by reducing the number of federal employees, we actually will then end up contacting people to do those tasks any way. and we cannot account of them -- count them as part of the government. but we are just paying more for that resource and now. people need to recognize that when we take our resources, it is a finite amount. it truly is. and we take that finite amount and we decide we are not going to pay a
to gather this morning thanks to the generosity of united technologies, utc. it's a very diversified company comprised of several well-known plans -- brands. utc climate controls and security and the utc aerospace including goodrich. they have been a wonderful partner. this is our final charlie cook given this year. the partner with us on the congressional poll that we do of congress is in session to bring that news and information here. as readers, you can be informed via utc and the polling as well. thank you to the entire team at utc for partnering with us not only on the charlie cook events but on the congressional poll. he is the senior vice president of global relations meaning he leads all of the government affairs activities for utc as well as all activities in that area. he is well known in washington. please welcome greg ward. [applause] >> thank you, victoria. thank you for that introduction. charlie just wanted to know what she was smoking to have such a nice introduction for me. it's nice to have an overflow crowd. something must have happened last night. must be the nats coming
's hire another 100,000 math and science teachers to make sure we maintain a technological lead and people are skilled and able to succeed. hard-pressed states right now cannot do that. we have seen layoffs of hundreds of thousands of teachers over the last several years. gov. romney does not think we need more teachers, i do. i think that is the kind of investment or the federal government can help. it can make a difference. as a consequence we will have a better trained work force, and that will create jobs because companies want to locate in places where there is a skilled workforce. >> two minutes, governor. , on the role of government. >> i love great schools. massachusetts, our schools are ranked no. one of 50 states. the key to grade schools, is great teachers. i reject the idea i do not believe in great teachers. every state should make that decision on their own. the role of government -- look behind us. the constitution and the declaration of independence. the role of governmentis to promote and protect the principles of those documents first. life and liberty -- we have a respon
that google will not continue to face lots of competitive rivalry from innovations in search technology. i will say a few words about the doctrine. the unicorn of antitrust law. everybody thinks they know it looks like a no one has actually seen one in the class. the idea is that there is some facility that is hard to duplicate. the owner of the facility is excluding competitors from using its and there are a few other elements to the test. in a case of internet search, the asserted facility is placed on google's page. but there's only limited amount of space that can come up on the page. so it is not possible that every competitor that thinks it is essential to be on the page can be accommodated. it is not clear how such a remedy would be feasible even if he thought it was necessary to do this in order to improve competition to benefit consumers. the u.s. courts have been very reluctant to buy into the essential facilities theory. the supreme court has said it has never endorsed the idea. it is very unlikely that an antitrust claim against google would ever succeed in court. i think i bet
to identify what ways the fcc could establish a regulatory framework in the communications technology sector. be a leader in that job creation and economic growth. it is one of the more dynamic parts of the economy. if you look at the statistics, job growth and economic growth has slowed in that department. identified three areas where the fcc could do more with respect to the it sector. to the it sector.
house races. the white house is technology an attempt to infiltrate its computer system, but said it has supported the effort corporate -- has thwarted the effort. they said they isolated the event to prevent spread. they also said there was no indication any information was removed. last year, googled blamed hackers in china for accessing the records of many who including senior u.s. officials and military personnel those are some of the latest headlines on c-span. >> there is a lot of information out there that mobile usage is even higher among minority communities, then even among white communities. i have seen some pretty startling research in some of the minority communities, 70% of the broad band -- of the broadband is mobile. i am not a critic of broadband mobile what ever. after the verizon transaction we are in the business. and my comment now is not a platform comment. it is more a device, and na platform comment. that is, if you're going to do mobile on a laptop and you are going to get real propagandist because lte types peace, i do not have a problem whatsoever. but if you'r
to make sure we maintain our technological lead and our people are skilled and are able to succeed. and hard-pressed states right now cannot all do that. we've seen layoffs of hundreds of thousands of teachers over the last several years, and governor romney doesn't need more teachers. i do. i think that is the kind of and is and where the federal government can help. -- kind of investment where the federal government can help. it cannot do it all, but it will make a difference. that will create jobs because companies want to locate in places where we've got a skilled workforce. >> 2 minutes, governor, on the role of government. >> first, i love great schools. massachusetts, our schools are ranked number one of all 50 states. the key to great schools, great teachers. i reject the idea that i don't believe in great teachers or more teachers. every school district in every state should make their decision on their own. the role of government -- look behind us. the constitution and the declaration of independence. the role of government is about to protect the principles of those docu
, on the web, are measured more carefully by the technology companies and the internet companies in that business, either outside the debate hall, both google and twitter have displays for they are tracking incoming comments that are arriving via youtube or on twitter. they are tracking what subjects the american people are tweeting on, and they will have a good handle on what kind of viewership or participation or unique visitors they are having to their sites later on tonight. it is no question that the vast majority of americans will be encountering this as they have done traditionally, through the broadcast media, although that is diverse now to and is available in a lot of ways. the network pool, all the networks that are pulling their resources -- they will be distributing this in a way of a lot of viewers who may not see this on a traditional fashion, but may see it so they can multitask and comment as the debate goes on the question, how will the size of the audience at the end, i think the combined audience will add to that, the aggregated audience on the internet. been
teachers to make sure we maintain a technological lead and people are skilled and able to succeed. hard-pressed states right now cannot do that. we have seen layoffs of hundreds of thousands of teachers over the last several years. gov. romney does not think we need more teachers, i do. i think that is the kind of investment or the federal government can help. it can make a difference. as a consequence we will have a better trained work force, and that will create jobs because companies want to locate in places where there is a skilled workforce. >> i love great schools. massachusetts, our schools are ranked no. one of 50 states. the key to grade schools, is great teachers. i reject the idea i do not believe in great teachers. every state should make that decision on their own. the role of government -- look behind us. the constitution and the declaration of independence. is to promote and protect the principles of those documents first. life and liberty -- we have a responsibility to protect the lives of people. i do not believe in cutting the military. i want to maintain the strength
those investment bankers over there in four hours. i don't think we can afford a piece of technological elegance like that. i would strike that sort of thing. i don't know how many people have rid -- ridden in the con cord -- concorde, not many, but i voted against it, said it would be a financial disaster, and it's been just that. >> senator. >> so those are the types of things i would work on. >> senator quayle? >> the way we're going to reduce this budget deficit and it's a challenge to make sure that it is reduced, is first to stick to the gramm-rudman targets. the gramm--rudman targets have worked. we've reduced the federal budget deficit $70 billion. senator bentsen voted against the gramm-rudman, the very tool that has been used to bring the federal budget deficit down. we're going to need all the tools possible to bring this federal budget deficit down. we need the tools of a line item veto. a line item veto that 43 governors in this country have but not the president of the united states. >> tom brokaw, the last question for senator bentsen. >> senator bentsen, i'd ask you abo
yield to the power of technology. when this happens, our region will be guided not by fanaticism and conspiracies, but by reason and curiosity. i think the relevant question is this -- it is not whether this fanaticism will be defeated. it is, how many lives will be lost before it is defeated? we have seen that happen before, too. some 70 years ago, the world saw another fanatic ideology bent on world conquest. it went down in flames, but not before it took millions of people with it. those who oppose the fanaticism waited too long to react. in the end, the tyrant, but at a horrific cost. my friends, we cannot let that happen again. at stake is not nearly the future of my country, but the stake of the future of the world. nothing can imperil our common future more than the army of iran with nuclear weapons. to understand what the world will be like with a nuclear- armed iran, imagine the world with a nuclear armed al qaeda. it makes little difference whether these lethal weapons are in the hands of the world's most dangerous terrorist regime or the world will the mark most danger
governance, the latest of which was held at the wilson center in june on science and technology innovation. these symposia not only promote dialogue among global stakeholders, but also allow participants to develop personal connections. the institute also recently released an initial report on u.s.-china it security perceptions, another big project we are working on with leading research institutions in the u.s. and beijing. just last week we polished "sustaining u.s.-china cooperation and a clean energy," an overview of the difficulties both countries face in developing alternative energy industries and the potential room for cooperation. last november, finally, and we participated in another one of our national conversations -- henry participated in another one of our national conversations, entitled "afghanistan -- is there are regional end game." he resisted when he learned that we had organized a brilliant panel of scholars to, on in his remarks. we had not cleared the names with him and he did not know all the people and he was not happy. but he gave brief remarks, just as he will to
worked this job before. i have the technology and experience they are seeking. after those people since june of this year -- i have been after these people since june of next year and i will start this week. i spent probably close to $1,400 to go to a job interview in north dakota. i was there for half an hour for the job interview. it cost me $1,400 round trip to go there to seek out this job. host: next up is savannah, georgia. caller: 94 cspan. i am employed. i'm from savannah, georgia. i was working in construction. the building industry went down. i looked at other options. in savannah, we have a great deal of the employment in transportation, import/export business, containers. it is booming and truck drivers are needed. in this area. i think that many people who have been unemployed in certain industries have to look at other ways to get jobs that are available. there are a lot of other jobs available. host: is it hard to get out one mindset of being in one career and going to another? caller: i have a c.l. license to be able to be in the industry i was in. i was prepared because
together with weapons of mass destruction, the deadly technologies that saddam hussein had developed and used over the years. the fact of the matter is that -- the big difference is they are not prepared to deal with states that sponsor terror. they've got a very limited view about how to use u.s. military force to defend america. we heard senator kerry say the other night that there ought to be some kind of global test before u.s. troops are deployed pre-emptively to protect the united states. that's part of a track record that goes back to the 1970's when he ran for congress the first time and said troops should not be deployed without u.n. approval. then in the mid 1980's, he ran on the basis of cutting most of our major defense programs. in 1991, he voted against desert storm. it's a consistent pattern over time of always being on the wrong side of defense issues. a little tough talk in the midst of a campaign or as part of a presidential debate cannot obscure a record of 30 years of being on the wrong side of defense issues. and they give absolute no ibbed case based on that rec
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